Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) Analysis Solution

Mechanical shock pulses are often analyzed in terms of the shock response spectrum. The shock response spectrum assumes that the shock pulse is applied as a base input to an array of independent single-degree-of-freedom systems. SDOF system assumes that each system hat its own natural frequency.

Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) Test and Analysis solution from Dewesoft
Charge
Charge
IEPE
IEPE
Voltage
Voltage
Acceleration
Acceleration
Velocity
Velocity
Displacement
Displacement
Video
Video
High-speed video
High-speed video

Main Features

  • SUPPORTED ISO STANDARD: Our SRS solution calculates the shock response spectrum according to ISO 18431-4 standard.
  • EASY SETUP: The sensors and data acquisition system setup is fast and easy. Sensors autodetection and TEDS support will get you to measure in no time.
  • SELECTABLE FREQUENCY SPAN: Freely definable calculation range for the frequency spectrum.
  • DAMPING/QUALITY FACTOR: The selection of damping ratio or quality factor can be easily updated also in the offline mode.
  • ADVANCED MATH: All relevant parameters such as composite/maximax, primary, residual are calculated online in real-time. Results in the frequency domain spectrum can be shown as acceleration, velocity or displacement.
  • DATA EXPORT: The recorded data and calculated parameters can easily be exported in various standard data formats including Mathlab, Excel, Diadem, FlexPro, Universal File Format, and others.
  • LIFETIME FREE SOFTWARE UPGRADES AND SUPPORT: Our data acquisition systems come bundled with award-winning Dewesoft X data acquisition software. The software package is always evolving and new features are being added. We offer lifetime FREE software upgrades and technical support to all our users.

What is Shock Response Spectrum (SRS)

A Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) is a graphical presentation of a transient acceleration pulse’s potential to damage a structure. The horizontal axis shows the natural frequency of a hypothetical Single Degree Of Freedom (SDOF), and the vertical axis shows the peak acceleration which this SDOF would undergo as a consequence of the shock input. 

A shock response spectrum is a useful tool for estimating the damage potential of a shock pulse, as well as for test level specification.

The shock response spectrum is a calculated function based on the acceleration time history. It applies an acceleration time history as an excitation to an array of single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems. Each system is assumed to have no mass-loading effect on the base input.

Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) Analysis and Calculations

  • Start frequency and end frequency: Define the calculation range for the frequency spectrum. The upper limit is set to 2000 Hz.
  • Velocity DC filter: Removes the DC component of the calculated time signal.
  • Remove DC offset: Removes the DC component of the input time signal.
  • Noise floor: Calculate the noise floor of the input time signal-.
  • Frequency division (octave): Removes the DC component of the calculated time signal.
  • Damping/quality factor: Different damping factors produce different SRSs for the same shock waveform. Zero dampings will produce a maximum response and very high damping produces a horizontal line.

SRS Output Channels

All the output channels are calculated for acceleration, velocity, and displacement.

The output channels are:

  • Absolute max (whole measurement): composite/maximax (the worst-case extrema for both instances). The composite shock response for the absolute maxima is the maximax.
  • Max (whole measurement): composite/maximax (the worst-case extrema for both instances). The composite shock response for the absolute maxima is the maximax.
  • Min (whole measurement): composite/maximax (the worst-case extrema for both instances). The composite shock response for the absolute maxima is the maximax.
  • Absolute max during shock: the primary (forced response, computation during the shock).
  • Max during shock: the primary (forced response, computation during the shock).
  • Min during shock: the primary (forced response, computation during the shock).
  • Absolute max aftershock: residual (free vibration, computation after the shock).
  • Max aftershock: residual (free vibration, computation after the shock).
  • Min aftershock: residual (free vibration, computation after the shock).

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